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Ghosts in My Literature – Writing Novels

Guest post by high desert author

Roberta Smith, a Victor Valley author, reveals what influenced her to write novels about ghosts. She is a member of the high desert branch of California Writers Club. High Desert Blogging features articles by high desert authors about writing novels and nonfiction.

High desert author

Paranormal Novel Author, Roberta Smith

Recently I gave a talk at the Arts Council in Menifee and with only nine people present, including me and my husband, it was the most fun I ever had giving a presentation.  Why? Because the audience loved it. READ MORE »

High Desert California Writers

The Victor Valley area is home to talented writers and authors. You can read about their craft, books, and events often by reading their blogs. The High Desert California Writers Club holds a monthly meeting for writers. Currently, they meet at the Community Church at Jess Ranch located at 11537 Apple Valley Road, Apple Valley, CA. Special writing events and opportunities, such as writers’ salons and critique groups, are accessible to members of the group.

 

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Writing salons became popular in the early 1900’s when Jack London and other literary enthusiasts, poets, and writers met in the Oaklands hills of California. Jack London authored notable books such as The Call of the Wild, The Iron Heel, White Fang, and The Sea-Wolf. In 1909 the popular literary salons officially became known as the California Writers Club.

Blogging Salon

Writing Salon, HDCWC

The craft of writing requires dedication and consistency. London, the most popular author in the early twentieth century, wrote 1,000 words a day. His regular writing habit, obviously, paid off. The Call of the Wild made him famous in his 20’s. He was known as the best paid American writer in his era. A recent book about him is Jack London In Boyhood Adventures, a memoir by Frank Irving Atherton.

Anyone can publish a book in the twenty-first century. Print-on-demand publishing makes it easy for authors to see their books in print. Editing isn’t always a top priority for all who choose the self-publishing route, however. Perhaps the extra cost of hiring proofreaders and editors discourages some individuals. Writers owe it to themselves to find someone to critique their work. One of the most valuable benefits to becoming a member of the High Desert Branch of California Writers Club (HDCWC) is the opportunity to join a critique group.

You can learn more about HDCWC authors and their books as well as follow their blogs. Three are listed below for you, and you can find others listed on Angie’s Book List on this site.

 

Sources:

  1. http://calwriters.org/
  2. http://www.getyourwordsworth.com/WORDSWORTH-JackLondon.html
  3. http://www.biography.com/people/jack-london-9385499#commercial-success

 

 

 

Improv Garden Writing Salon

Improv Salons

Improv Garden Salon

Improv and writing

Open up the flow of words with improv garden writing games and exercises. Different than the typical writing salon, the improv garden version adds a comical twist and garden-related. An improv salon, encouraged at places like Berkeley Word Party Meetup group, is a “fun, loosely structured way to generate stories and ideas” and is quite popular.

Saturday, October 25th, a few members of the High Desert Branch of the California Writers Club (HDCWC) met in a lovely garden. John and Karen Kane, a husband and wife improv team from www.i2the6th.com led the group in warm-up word games. Following the word games, I asked the group to write a sentence focused on any word from the games and somehow connected to a garden. Blogger and HDCWC member Rusty LaGrange refers to this one-sentence writing game as Chained Sentences.

What does improv have to do with writing? Plot, characters and dialogue of a game, scene or story are made up in the moment. Improvisation is a great tool for writers block. Learn more about improv in the book, Upright Citizens Brigade, a comedy manual.

Fran Sorin recommends tips like surrender, imagine, and work your creativity muscles. Fran says to let go of control. It’s a great opportunity to laugh at yourself. I love her imagine statement to create scenarios that are goofy, paradoxical, real. That’s what we did at last Saturday’s improv garden salon. Yes, the chained sentences were a mix of goofy, paradoxical, and real – and hilarious.

The word game that John and Karen taught the improv garden salon group required listening and staying in the moment. Focusing on what the other person was saying was the only way to get through the game.

Incidentally, Fran Sorin is a gardener and garden designer. I have a hunch that she would have loved participating in our Improv Garden Salon.

Garden inspired writing

A Pink and Yellow Rose in Autumn

Improv Garden Writing

Pink and Yellow Rose in Autumn

 

Walking through or sitting in a garden inspires a writer with ideas, color, sounds. Standing near tall rosebushes in Karen’s garden in front of her house, I closed my eyes to focus on sounds. First, I wrote down my thoughts. Then, I decided to capture the sound on video. You can hear the wind. Watch as the roses wave in the wind:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-StXfOPvZs&feature=youtu.be

Ah. Fascinating. Beautiful.

We had fifteen minutes of quiet garden time to write down what inspired us. Afterwards, we met again at the picnic table on the back porch and share our inspiration.

Improv writing may be focused on any topic you choose. Gardening is what I chose because I love it. Gardening provided inspiration, and improv helped us to build some creativity muscles.

 

If you love pink in a garden, visit Pink Saturday. You’ll love visiting the pink beauties!

 

Less than a week before we hit the trail through NaNo Land

 

Plot bunny

With only just six days to go, are you ready to hit the trail through NaNo Land?

 

As promised I’m back with more NaNoWriMo trivia, helps and hints.

 

NaNo Challenges are traditions that help the writer reach their 50,000 work count goal. At any point along the trail you may encounter one of the following:

 

  • The Traveling Shovel of Death – this is a challenge to include at some point a shovel into your story. More often than not the shovel will be used to bury or bludgeon someone – but not necessarily so.
  • NaNoWriMo Anagram – this challenge asks you to name a character using an anagram of letters in NaNoWriMo. For example, I named a character “Orwin Mano”.
  • Word-a-day Challenge – usually a thread on your regional forum where a new word is listed every day and you must work it into your story that day.  Many participants return to the forum thread and post the sentence.
  • Word Sprints – this challenge also known as “Word Wars” can be done at a Write-In (more on that later) or online (Via forums, Facebook, Twitter). A time limit is set, 15 minutes or more, and the challenge is to see who can produce the most words during that time period.
  • Guilt Monkeys – the Guilt Monkey comes to us thanks to the founder of NaNoWriMo, Chris Baty. Guilt Monkeys will nag you to finish your daily word counts. Here’s how it works – your ML gives out numbered envelopes at random that contain the Guilt Monkeys. To track the movement of the Guilt Monkeys there is thread to post on (Which Monkey was passed to who and why.)You can pass the Guilt Monkey off to another WriMo if you:
    • Reach your 50,000 word goal
    • Compete in Cauldron of Doom Challenge  (you do not need to win),
    • Win a Word Sprint,
    • Make a donation to NaNoWrimo.

 

If you don’t want to burden others with your Guilt Monkeys the MLs have a foster home for them until they can be adopted by someone in need of Guilt Monkey love.

 

  • The Cauldron of Doom – this is a difficult challenge that comes to us from Lansing MI. In this challenge the participants must complete 1250 words, in 20 minutes (I’ve seen various word counts for this challenge.)
  • Plot Bunnies – as John Steinbeck said, “Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.” Plot bunnies are really cute and cuddly but you have to be cautious with them. They can lead you to some really wonderful vista of ideas or into a box canyon of despair.

You’ve been working on your novel and now you are stuck – where do you get help? The following are great places to go:

  • Write-Ins – NaNo public gatherings. For a Write-in WriMos gather at public place such as restaurant or coffee house and write. It’s that simple. During the event challenges may be issued, prizes awarded and suggestions make.
  • NaNoWriMo Forums – there are lots of threads with wonderful suggestions
  • Adoption Society – one of my favorite forums.  On this forum you will find abandoned titles, characters and plots looking for a good home.
  • The Dare Machine – If you want add a twist to your story then mosey on over to the Young Writers Program home page (ywp.nanwrimo.org) and try out the Dare Machine. Push the button and do what it says, for example “have one of your characters go missing for a chapter”.
  • Inner Editor Containment Unit – This also come to us from the YWP. Draw a box with a big red button. Now imagine your inner editor – what does she/he/it look like? Sound like? Now push the button, you inner editor has now been removed from your head and into the IECU for the next 30 days and will be kept occupied proof reading the NaNo Website. December first they will be returned to you.

 

See you at the trail head on November 1st!

 

National Novel Writing Month Twelve Days and Counting

Twelve days until the adventure begins.

Twelve days until the adventure begins.

With only twelve days left until NaNoWriMo begins things are starting to heat up in NaNo-Land. If you haven’t decided to join us on this year’s word round up it’s not too late.

First some definitions so we are speaking the same language:

WriMo – noun, a person who participates in NaNoWriMo

YWP – NaNoWriMo for K – 12 students, where they set an appropriate word goal for their age and skill level.

Planner – a WriMo who plans out their novel, amount of planning varies with each individual

Pantser – a WriMo who just starts writing on Nov. 1st with no idea of where they are going and just let the story happen.

So what do you do during the remaining days until 12:01 AM Nov. 1, 2014?

  1. Sign up for NaNoWriMo or YWP-NaNoWrimo.
  2. Set up your Novel on the site
  3. Join a region, we’re USA :: California :: San Bernardino
  4. Check out the region’s Google calendar to see if there are any events you want to attend and add do your personal calendar
  5. Attend the NaNoWriMo Kick-off and information event on Oct 25, 2014 the Fieldheim Library in San Bernardino
  6. (Pantsers you may skip this one) Prepare for writing
    1. Character charts
    2. Plot outlines
    3. Research, as necessary.
    4. Get up at 11:45 PM on Oct 31, 2014 and stand by.
    5. At 12:01 AM Nov 1, 2014 head out on the trail and start writing.

Remember High Desert WriMos were are gathering at High Desert Book Oasis on Nov 1 to celebrate and encourage each other as we start down the dusty trail toward 50,000 words by 11:59 Nov 31, 2014.

Next week – defining plot bunnies and other NaNoLand denizens.

 

NaNoWriMo is coming! Are you ready?

I'm participating are you?

I’m participating are you?

NaNoWriMo is coming! NaNoWriMo is coming!

What is NaNoWriMo?

The creators of NaNoWriMo define it as: “National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is a fun, seat-of-your-pants approach to creative writing. On November 1, participants begin working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 PM on November 30.” http://nanowrimo.org/about

It is a fun roller-coaster ride. You rise to the top creating your novel and watch your word count soar. Then you plummet in to the dark canon that is thinking written yourself into a corner or you’ve falling behind on your word count only to find you start to rise again.

If you’ve ever thought, “I could do better than this guy.” Then NaNoWriMo is for you.

If you’ve ever thought, “I’d like to write a story, someday.” Then NaNoWriMo is for you.

If you’ve ever thought, “I’m not creative, writing scares me.” Then NaNoWriMo is for you.

As the Municipal Liaison (ML) for the San Bernardino Region of NaNoWriMo I invite you to join me on this adventure toward completing your first novel.

As a member of the NaNoWriMo community I challenge you to join me because:

  1. You never know what you can do until you try.
  2. You’ll make some new friends, online and at community events.
  3. You’ll have fun.

For more information and to sign-up for NaNoWriMo go to http://nanowrimo.org/

Once you’ve created your account mosey on over to the regional page an introduce yourself.

Comment to score some cool NaNoWriMo sway from yours truly.

Tess DeGroot AKA Victorville-Tess Municipal Liaison for San Bernardino region.

nano_14_ml_badge_150px

 

 

 

 

 

I can also be found at: www.tessdegroot-books.com

Welcome Fall with the Warmth of Old-Fashioned Letter Writing

The Art of Letter Writing

Old-Fashioned Letter Writing

When was the last time you wrote an old-fashioned letter to a friend or relative in the High Desert or afar and put a stamp on the envelope?

I heard this trivia question asked on KSGN this week: “Ninety percent of teens have never used this – what is it?” The answer is postage stamps.

The need for postage stamp use has certainly declined from the Traditional Generation of the World War II era to the current Generation Y (Why). When you can text and email and pay bills online, snail mail seems pointless.

Letters and messages were delivered by posts (postmen, runners, or couriers) since ancient and biblical times on foot and by animal.

In 1860 the Pony Express was established by stagecoach operators. They carried mail from San Francisco, California to St. Joseph, Missouri. The Pony Express only lasted until 1861.


When people wrote letters in ancient times and up to the 19th century, they used wax seals to keep them secure. This art has not been completely lost, however.

Writing letters to my grandmothers and friends was something I loved to do back in the day. I still have the sealing stamp and two of the colored wax sticks I used to make a seal on the flap of the back of envelopes.

Try out the old-fashioned art of hand-written letter writing this fall. Bring joy to loved ones by hand-writing a personal letter, and seal the envelope with fancy colored wax. If you receive a thank you back, let us hear from you in the comment section.

 

High Desert Viewpoint: The Fear of Writing

After cruising the Internet for a few writing resources, I believe I’ve found the major stumbling blocks and their remedies for the dreaded and brain-draining fear of writing. I’ve heard directly from friends who wish to write only to sling up a brick-and-mortar defensive wall with reasons not to write. Is your dream to write caught in a cloud over your head?

 

What fears we face, we face first in our minds.

What fears we face, we face first in our minds.

It might be that English was never a great subject of yours. Or a teacher hammered in the grammar and distilled the frills until you felt your writing had less appeal than an accounting ledger. Just so many rules to remember, and so many hours to invest in a finished product that might receive a weak C+. It happened to me in sixth grade, too. Until Mrs. Gifford pulled me out of the ooze of English muddle and sent me on a better course. I wanted to write from my mind not the English III hardbound textbooks that we lugged around like that albatross.

Fear is lifted to new heights

Fear is lifted to new heights

 

As a professional writer, you may feel that you have a gift, a calling, having never faced a teacher of English or Composition who marked you as a drudgery of their daily life. Only, they hoped you would make it through class, and you hoped for a fire drill.

 

So step forward, 40 or 50 years, past the letter writing, the book reports, the attempt at polishing the resume, and a short stint at prosy poetry — Your reason for writing is clear. It’s because you want to. Some little germ of an idea has been festering for years. It could be that book. It was stepped on and ground into your brain like the creative juice it started from.

Fear is a strong emotion needing stronger conviction

Fear is a strong emotion needing stronger conviction

 

So why now? Because the kids are gone to their new homes, time is running out, time is running too slow? No need for judgment now. Just pick up your favorite … well, any writing instrument or computer screen will do … just write.

 

Sure, that’s easy for me to say. Here’s a few gems gleaned from the Internet and writing gurus across the blogosphere:

 

1) Take on the writer in you with effervescent yet smaller steps. Allow yourself to mull over an idea from all sides. Write it down. Write several pages then stop and see what you’ve done. Not bad. Reward yourself. The process of writing has many facets: an idea, the fleshing out, writing it down, scratching lines out, rewriting what we’ve written from a different angle. It’s all the things you’ll need to do — and do often.

 

Everything is fear until you face it

Everything is fear until you face it

2) Avoid fixing things as you write. Sort of like baking a cake; don’t peek or it will fall. Most new writers are timid in sharing what they write. They want everything perfect first. How can you be perfect before you finish the draft, or even the first chapter? These little tricks you play on yourself will only fall into the hands of the Muse who taunts you. Constantly fixing things will bog down your creativity, slow your writing, and degrade the excitement of why you are finally writing.

 

Outside of the box is outside your comfort zone

Outside of the box is outside your comfort zone

 

3) Use tools like the professionals do. Some like to outline to keep in step to a targeted end. Some like to “mindmap.” Some feel that this method works so much better than outlining and it will give you a more relaxed access to your inner thoughts. You are trying to extract the ideas and place them in a way that leads you on.  You can Google mindmapping for more details but what you do is take one or two key words or ideas, present them on blank paper, then allow your mind to free-flow with thoughts that are linked to these words. Write them down and circle them. Connect lines to a similar thought that grew from the main one. Soon you’ll have a sheet of circled words connected to thoughts that move you on to your next chapter.

 You can create fictional characters in this way, too. By starting with a name, then linking all is attributes that define him. Include the other characters who are related to him. Soon you’ll have a collection of Cast Cards. You can refer to them to refresh your thoughts. I prefer to use index cards. I can write scenes on them, characters on them, and link ideas with them.

 Free Write Friday poster

 

4) Emulate your favorites. Print out a few pages of your favorite blogger, or rewrite several pages from a favorite book. They say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery so write daily for 30 to 60 minutes each day. Test your brain muscle. Put it through some paces that challenge it. The copy concept is easy: write regularly, practice from others but never claim others’ work as your own. Practice will make the brain see the inner workings of sentence structure, use of adverbs, and strength of phrases connected by verbs. We all have trained prior to doing … anything worth doing. You will see a difference in your own writing that no English III book can cram into your brain. And face it, your brain wasn’t ready back then; now it is.

 

I think that blogging has taken a boost in quality writing due to the short form of it, and the need to be read. Only the better bloggers have a larger following based on quality and specific, focused interest. Usually under 1,000 words, bloggers retain their readers because they offer what a reader wants — high quality, fast read. Finding that target audience is the tough part.

Face it head on and begin writing

Face it head on and begin writing

 

5) Write a lot. There’s not much to this. Just write. I admit that I’m wired to write. I started with poetry in fifth grade, then wrote short stories about my favorite TV characters. Then on to college and writing obits for a local newspaper, then news articles flowed right into journalism. It was all practice, and I don’t feel foolish having gone through those phases. You may not feel “writerly,” as one author said, but you will feel more fulfilled knowing that that novel churning in your head spilled all over the floor and now you have an excuse to pick it up, wring it out, and proceed to write. Come on! Be a writer.

Don't let emotions rule your life

Don’t let emotions rule your life

 Rusty LaGrange

Is There No Integrity Among Bloggers?

file0001462552138The topic of this post has been rolling around in my mind for at least the last six months.  For those of you who don’t know me, I am a French lingerie model.  I am 5 feet 11 inches tall, and I weigh 120 pounds.  Because of my success as a model, I am independently wealthy, and I spend about six months of the year living on my Lürssen yacht.  For those of you who know me and are wondering what the &$@# I’m talking about, everything I just said was all a lie.  Of course, since it’s on the internet, it must be true.  Actually, I need to make a correction.  I should say that all of it was a lie except for the part about the topic of the post rolling around the back of my mind for the last six months.

It all started with the Daddy Long Legs who was hanging out on some equipment where I work.  I was vanquishing him with my hands because I had been raised to believe that they were beneficial spiders that would kill poisonous spiders and eat them.  In other words, Daddy Long Legs was a friend.    A co-worker immediately began freaking out because she believed that these spiders were poisonous.  I am by no means a spider expert, but I was certain that my mother would have mentioned to me the fact that they were poisonous if that were the case.  She treated black widows and brown recluse spiders in a very different way than she treated the daddy long legs.  I questioned my co-worker further and she stated that they were poisonous but that they couldn’t bite because of the position of their mouths.  If that was the case, I wondered why she was so freaked out.  Regardless, her opinion about the spider didn’t seem right to me.

When I got home, I did an internet search and discovered the following.  There were a bunch of blogs that solemnly proclaimed her opinion as  fact and to be true.  Some even stated that the venom of the daddy long legs spider was more toxic than the black widow.  When I went to University of California at Riverside’s website, though, I discovered the following.

  1. My mother was correct.  Daddy long legs is not poisonous.  He will eat other spiders and other bugs.
  2. My c0-worker was wrong.  Daddy long legs can bite.  His mouth is in the same position as the brown recluse and we have all heard that Mr. Brown Recluse is certainly capable of biting.  In fact. the bite of the Brown Recluse has been shown to result in tissue death which can result in serious infection.
  3. Some bloggers post anything they want on their websites without regard to the accuracy of the information they present.
  4. There are people like that girl from the State Farm commercial who believe that if it’s on the internet it must be true.

If you don’t believe me or the university, try the MythBusters segment that you can view by clicking here.  (If it’s on TV, it’s true, right?)

So, while I continued to ponder a post complaining about the lack of blog-tegrity (integrity among bloggers to ensure, at least, that their information is correct), life continued.  It was something that my son showed me on his Facebook page that finally spurred me into action.  What he presented to me was a link to the following headline:

HOBBY LOBBY STONES GAY EMPLOYEE TO DEATH.  (Click here to follow the link to the original article.)

As I read this article two things occurred to me.  There was no way this story was true, and it was going to go viral.  It did.  Within a day or two of publication, this article was spreading like wild fire.  Suddenly, many bloggers were weighing in with their opinion.  There were several blogs and internet sites that jumped onto the Hobby Lobby and Christian Bashing bandwagon.  I would link to the specific posts on these sites, but after Snopes.com reported that it was a false claim, many of these posts disappeared.    I was particulary horrified by the post that ranted about what people would say if it was a company owned by Muslims who started forcing their religious views on employees and executing women who didn’t wear hijabs or burqas.  Alas, the post is no more, so I can’t link to it.  All I get when I go there is a page not found message.

I am certain that there are many bloggers out there thanking God for the Move to Trash button on their blog sites.  Unlike the “famously incorrect Dewey Defeats Truman banner headline” published by the Chicago Tribune back in the glory days of print newspapers, bloggers can just erase those embarrassing mistakes.  Maybe that’s why no one bothers to ensure that their posts are accurate.  As I write this, there are still a few comment boards on sites and some Facebook comments that you can find, but largely, the moral outrage over the stoning death of the fictitious Hobby Lobby employee has dwindled.

There is no specific code of ethics for bloggers.  Journalistic integrity includes the expectation “that the journalist will  be as accurate as possible given the time allotted to story preparation and the space available, and to seek reliable sources.”   They also publish corrections when errors are made.  They don’t just move the whole thing to the trash and pretend it didn’t happen.  Perhaps, we, as bloggers,  need to establish our own code of ethics and standards of conduct.  Maybe someone already has, and no one bothers to adhere to it.

As bloggers, I believe that we have a certain amount of moral responsibility.  The things that we report should be as accurate as possible.  When I read that article with my outraged son, I did the following research before I allowed myself to become upset.  I checked to see if  Hobby Lobby had any stores in Arkansas.  I discovered that there were at least 7.  I checked to make sure that homicide was against the law in Arkansas, and I found out that it was.  I checked to see which, if any, of the stores were located in Wilson county, and discovered that there was no Wilson county in Arkansas.  Hmmm….I found two problems with the story–no one was arrested for homicide, and there was no Wilson county.     I was convinced that the story was a lie, but my son required further proof.  (He is young and not nearly as cynical as I am.)

I found the proof he needed on the same site as the original article.  If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, past all the comments, and whatever else there is, you will find a link that says ‘About”.  If you click on that link, you will find the following.

The Daily Currant is an English language online satirical newspaper that covers global politics, business, technology, entertainment, science, health and media. It is accessible from over 190 countries worldwide – now including South Sudan.

Our mission is to ridicule the timid ignorance which obstructs our progress, and promote intelligence – which presses forward.

Q. Are your news stories real?

A. No. Our stories are purely fictional. However they are meant to address real-world issues through satire and often refer and link to real events happening in the world

Everyone, calm down.  Put down the picket signs.  Cancel the boycott.   Hobby Lobby did NOT stone an employee to death.  What is my point in this post?  If you are a blogger, before you promote the spread of outrage based on fiction, check your facts.  Know your sources, and please, have some integrity.  Do your homework, and make sure you’re posting accurate information.  Don’t spread baseless rumors.  Granted, a controversial post can be good for boosting traffic and stimulating comments, but I believe that we should be providing information to help and enlighten people.  I don’t believe that my job as a blogger is to enrage people.  If you’re going to post satirical fiction, make sure it’s clear to your readers that’s what you do.  When you get an idea from someone else, give them credit with a link back to their site.  There’s enough web traffic to share.

 **Patti  can also be found at PattyCakesPantry.com where she tries to limit her blogging to stocking a pantry, budgeting, and recipes.  She isn’t always successful.

All Procrastinators Unite! … Tomorrow

It’s that nagging “procrastination” word.
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Everyone says do what makes you happy. And if procrastination had a useful and monetary outcome, I would be queen of the hill. My husband does not own any procrastination genes; he keeps busy after work until the sun goes down. He’s also my first person who asks me what I did that day. I feel unfulfilled. In my mind I’ve accomplished a lot.

Me, I could get up late, think about the stuff I should be doing, “putz” around the house doing a load of laundry, moving this or that, stopping to watch TV, eat some lunch, even pay some bills, without getting a lick of writing work done. I do believe it’s my “mulling over it” phase. Other writers have said that, more than half the time, a writer is simmering on what to write. Yeah, that’s me. I simmer, and mull, and procrastinate.

When I am productive I need to set a timer to remind myself to take breaks. Someone said that the best work environment will be your most productive zone. So I do what makes me happy and listen to my wind chimes while I type, or play native flute music (I have an extensive collection) or play a few computer games to allow simmering before writing.

The bottom line is that procrastinators are always working… you just can’t see the outcomes physically until the mental work is done. Knowing that makes me feel better about myself …  and happier.

So how do you do the mulling in your mind before you write? Are you an early riser with a load of writing to get on paper? Are you typically a reader-researcher and then a writer? Are you feeling guilty for not committing to a 1,000  words a day? Who said that was a reasonable amount to set? Are you guilty for thinking you’re guilty?

Rusty LaGrange

Rusty is a guest blogger and life-long procrastinator, who knows just why she does what she does, and enjoys being happy in mulling. Read her other blogs at www.MyRustyBucketRanch.BlogSpot.com and www.aFlairForTheOldWest.blogspot.com

 

 

 

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